CASA

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What is _____?: 

What is CASA?


Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate. CASA pairs volunteers with abused and neglected children in the community. The sole concern of the volunteer is to advocate for the interests of the child. You must be at least 21 to volunteer.

 

Volunteer Commitment: One year minimum commitment is required. Volunteers are expected to serve 10 hours a month.

Program Directors: 

Program Directors

 

 

Connor Bernal

​(206) 353-0437

 

Spencer Drennan

(425) 287-8473

 

Nathan Lees

(425) 563-3408

Fri 8:45 AM-9:45 AM

 

Micah Thatcher

(208) 351-6081

Mon 11:00 PM-12:00 PM

 

Active Semesters

Fall   Winter   Spring   Summer

 

 

 

 

How do I get involved?: 

How do I get involved?


Attend an information meeting and a training program.

For more information, email: casa@byu.edu.

 

Experiences: 

Experiences

 

My unofficial motto for CASA is that it provides real service to real people, and you get to see the changes happen in real time. For the small amount of work volunteers invest, they play a critical role in helping children who are struggling to navigate their way through teenage turmoil in addition to the complicated court system. By giving a little time and support, volunteers can help ensure the child's critical needs are addressed by the court and their attorney. It's a crucial service with lifelong dividends for the child, and also for the volunteer.

I met my CASA girl two years ago. We became fast friends, and I enjoyed going to visit her on a weekly or biweekly basis. Through countless Sodalicious trips, walks by the lake, video game sessions, and other activities, I learned what was going well for her, and what help she needed. I emailed my findings to her attorney, and I showed up to her court dates to hold her hand and be her friend. Hanging out with her was like having a little sister. We shared dating fiascos (and successes, but mostly fiascos), and talked about struggles at home and school. As she moved from one foster home to another, I always found a way to visit or call her. She is my good friend. I think of her often, and I'm grateful to CASA for the chance to befriend her, and to help her. Serving these children can seem challenging, scary, or even burdensome. But I wouldn't trade my time with my girl for any other activity. I'll continue to serve as a CASA volunteer throughout my adult life, wherever I go in the United States. Wherever I go, there will be children to meet, and children to help.  

–Madeline Buham (2018)

 

It has added another branch to my testimony by teaching me more about the Savior and the wonderful opportunity we have to do His work as we serve His other children here.

–Moriah Manwaring (2015)